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Barnestormer helps combat against COVID-19

Airman 1st Class Hannah Jones-Trudeau poses for a photo Feb. 23, 2021, while working for Massachusetts National Guard's Joint Force Headquarters, at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, and has been tasked with getting the COVID-19 vaccine to base. The COVID-19 vaccine is currently available to select Soldiers and Airmen based on risk and mission requirements but will be available widely as supplies increase. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Capt. Aaron Smith)

Airman 1st Class Hannah Jones-Trudeau poses for a photo Feb. 23, 2021, while working for Massachusetts National Guard's Joint Force Headquarters, at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, and has been tasked with getting the COVID-19 vaccine to base. The COVID-19 vaccine is currently available to select Soldiers and Airmen based on risk and mission requirements but will be available widely as supplies increase. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Capt. Aaron Smith)

Master Sgt. Chelsea LaViolette, training and education NCOIC for the 102nd Medical Group, Otis Air Force Base, Mass., and an immunization technician for CBRNE Task Force, loads one dose of the new COVID-19 vaccine to inoculate one of the volunteers who will receive it, here, Jan. 4, 2021. The vaccine is currently available to select Soldiers and Airmen based off of risk and mission requirements, but will be available widely as supplies increase. (Massachusetts National Guard Photo by Sgt. Tricia Andriski)

Master Sgt. Chelsea LaViolette, training and education NCOIC for the 102nd Medical Group, Otis Air Force Base, Mass., and an immunization technician for CBRNE Task Force, loads one dose of the new COVID-19 vaccine to inoculate one of the volunteers who will receive it, here, Jan. 4, 2021. The vaccine is currently available to select Soldiers and Airmen based off of risk and mission requirements, but will be available widely as supplies increase. (Massachusetts National Guard Photo by Sgt. Tricia Andriski)

Task Force Remedium receives the first box of the COVID-19 vaccine at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, Dec. 30, 2020. The COVID-19 vaccine is currently available to select Soldiers and Airmen based off of risk and mission requirements, but will be available widely as supplies increase. (U.S. Air National Guard courtesy photo)

Task Force Remedium receives the first box of the COVID-19 vaccine at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, Dec. 30, 2020. The COVID-19 vaccine is currently available to select Soldiers and Airmen based off of risk and mission requirements, but will be available widely as supplies increase. (U.S. Air National Guard courtesy photo)

Spc. Michael Lora, a combat medic with 182nd Infantry Company, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Melrose, Mass., volunteers to receive the vaccine for COVID-19, here, on Jan. 4, 2021. The vaccine is currently available to select Soldiers and Airmen based off of risk and mission requirements, but will be available widely as supplies increase. (Massachusetts National Guard Photo by Sgt. Tricia Andriski)

Spc. Michael Lora, a combat medic with 182nd Infantry Company, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Melrose, Mass., volunteers to receive the vaccine for COVID-19, here, on Jan. 4, 2021. The vaccine is currently available to select Soldiers and Airmen based off of risk and mission requirements, but will be available widely as supplies increase. (Massachusetts National Guard Photo by Sgt. Tricia Andriski)

BARNES AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Mass. --

 COVID-19 vaccine distribution has begun at the 104th Fighter Wing after nearly one year of combating the global pandemic. The 104th Medical Group has been working hard throughout the COVID-19 pandemic to help keep barnstormers healthy and safe.

Airman 1st class Hannah Jones-Trudeau, public health technician with the 104th Medical Group, has been working hard to ensure that the 104th FW members receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

“Obtaining the vaccine was not a simple process. There were some logistical challenges since it is a brand new vaccine that needs to be distributed at a large scale,” said Jones-Trudeau.

The COVID-19 vaccine was not available until late December of 2020. Jones-Trudeau worked hard to get the vaccine to the 104th FW in a timely manner.

“It has been a really dynamic process because operations work-speed has posed all kinds of unique challenges for vaccine distribution,” said Jones-Trudeau. “But we work with this really remarkable team of providers, clinicians, medical operations personnel, medical logistics personnel, and we're pulling from all different units to get the mission done.”

Jones-Trudeau was instrumental to the process of getting vaccinations to the members of the Massachusetts Air National Guard, said Lt. Col. Maria Costa, Task Force Remedium Commander Massachusetts Army National Guard Medical Command Unit.

“She spent a great deal of time researching information from numerous sources to include the Department of Defense, Defense Health Agency, Center for Disease Control, and vaccine manufacturers to help develop information packets for the recipients,” said Costa. “She also helped establish protocol for scheduling individuals for vaccine appointments.”

Currently, Jones-Trudeau is collecting data to track the vaccination progress and the trend analysis in her public safety capacity.

“She is truly a team player who continues to contribute countless hours as well as great ideas to help maintain and improve our processes,” said Costa.

Vaccination is a great tool to slow the spread of COVID-19, however, we must continue to practice social distancing, regular handwashing, and wearing a mask.

“These simple measures protect our communities and I know that taking care of the people around us is part of why so many of us put on the uniform,” said Jones-Trudeau.

The MA ANG has its own tier system for who is eligible to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

COVID-19 vaccinations are currently available to those who want them, based on their tier system. The first tier of people includes medical personnel, people supporting medical missions, essential critical personnel, and leadership. The second tier includes self-identifying high-risk individuals, and individuals who have conditions that put them at greater risk should they get COVID-19. The third tier is the general population on base.